Friday, September 21, 2018

Aircraft walkaround vol.98: Junkers D1


Subject: Junker D1
Location:Musée d'lair et de l'espace, Le Bourget, Paris, 2015.
Comments: The Junkers D.I (factory designation J 9) was a monoplane fighter aircraft produced in Germany late in World War I, significant for becoming the first all-metal fighter to enter service. The prototype, a private venture by Junkers designated the J 7, first flew on 17 September 1917, going through nearly a half-dozen detail changes in its design during its tests. When it was demonstrated to the Idflieg early the following year it proved impressive enough to result in an order for three additional aircraft for trials. However, the changes made by Junkers were significant enough for the firm to redesignate the next example the J 9, which was supplied to the Idflieg instead of the three J 7s ordered. During tests, the J 9 lacked the maneuverability necessary for a front-line fighter, but was judged fit for a naval fighter, and a batch of 12 was ordered. These were supplied to a naval unit by September 1918, which then redeployed to the Eastern Front after the Armistice
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Saturday, September 15, 2018

Experimental aircraft walkaround vol.9: Morane Saulnier Type G



Subject: Morane Saulnier Type G
Location:Musée d'lair et de l'espace, Le Bourget, Paris, 2015.
Comments:The Morane-Saulnier G was a two-seat sport and racing monoplane produced in France before the First World War. It was a development of the racing monoplanes designed by Léon Morane and Raymond Saulnier after leaving Borel and, like its predecessors, was a wire-braced, shoulder-wing monoplane. Construction was of fabric-covered wood throughout, except for the undercarriage struts which were of steel tube. The type was a sporting success. In April 1913, Roland Garros took second place in the inaugural Schneider Cup in a floatplane version, finishing with a time of 40 minutes 40 seconds. On 26 June, Claude Grahame-White flew another float-equipped example from Paris to London via Le Havre, Boulogne-sur-Mer, and Dover, covering some 500 km (310 mi) that day. Between 21 and 28 September the same year, two float-equipped Type Gs competed at the seaplane meeting at San Sebastián, with Lord Carbery winning the short takeoff prize on one, and Edmond Audemars winning the maneuverability prize on the other. The following week, Carbery flew his Type G in the Italian Waterplane Contest from Lake Como to Pavia and back, along with two other Type Gs in the field of fifteen competitors, these flown by Garros and Morane. Garros not only won the Grand Prize in the "general class", but also the prizes for best speed (127.7 km/h, 79.8 mph) and greatest altitude (2,100 m, 6,000 ft).On 28 September 1913 Roland Garros became the first person to cross the Mediterranean Sea by air, flying from Fréjus in the south of France to Bizerte in Tunisia in a Morane-Saulnier G.In 1914, Russian manufacturer Duks arranged to build the type under licence at their Moscow factory for the Russian Army, and the same year, the Turkish military ordered 40 examples. Before these could be delivered, however, war broke out, and the aircraft were impressed into the French Army. To these, the Army soon added an order of 94 aircraft, and the British Royal Flying Corps also acquired a number, these latter machines purchased from Grahame-White, who was manufacturing the type in the UK under licence. At the outbreak of war, the type's military value was found to be wanting, and the French machines were quickly relegated to training duties







Friday, August 24, 2018

Weapons vol.1: Geman 8cm GrW42 mortar



Subject:
German 8cm GrW42 mortar
Scale:
1/6
Manufacturer:
Dragon
Price
US$ 10,00 plus shipping
Description
Injected plastic model with waterslide decals.
Comments
This is dragon's 1/6 80mm GrW42 WWII mortar. I got it at our local hobby shop for about US$10,00 in a sale. At first i tough that i was just wasting money, but latter a decided to try some weathering techniques to improve the final result. The kit is very simple, almost a weekend project. Fit is nice and you can work in several subassemblies in order to make painting easier. The final result was a big surprise for me and i even decided to get more of these kits and make a nice display collection of weapons in  large scale. I used only Tamiya acrylics as usual, some Mig weathering products and a simple base to add interest to the final product. 








Friday, August 17, 2018

Technics vol.5: Scribing over raised panel lines

Scribing to obtain recessed panel lines is a tedious and difficult technique to master. Practice is the most important factor to get good results. Remember that there are alternative weathering techniques as i showed earlier, that included drawing with a sharp pencil along the raised details. However, old models with poor fit sometimes have the raised details destroyed by the building process that sometimes involve sanding and filling with putty. When this is the case, you may need to work all the panel lines and building raised details is far more difficult then to inscribe them all. In the pictures bellow, i will give you some suggestions on how i do inscribing on my kits. I am working on an Hasegawa F-5E in 1/32 scale.

First i take a sharp pencil and draw the panel lines to make them more visible before inscribing. I used the raised details as a guide to run the pencil along the panel lines.

These are my favorite tools: i like Tamiya scribing tool as an easy and effective instrument to do the job. A ruler and a very flexible piece of styrene are useful in order to align the scriber along the panel lines. Another very useful tool are these plastic label makers with adhesive on the back side. I allways work over a soft piece of cloth the keeps the model still under the pressure of my hand but allows easy movement of the part to get easy  access  to all the angles necessary to inscribe.

Once the panel lines are marked, i glue the label maker along them to create a point of support to the inscribing tool.

Keeping the sharp end of the blade at a 90 degrees angle to the surface of the model, first i push the nice along the panel line. This offers more control. Then i pull it back as it now runs inside a very subtle recessed panel previously done by the first movement.

Once all the panel where inscribed, a wet sand all the model with a 400 grid sand paper.

Some mistakes often occur. They are easily solved with some putty and sanding. Once this is done, all you need is to inscribe again. 

The finished work. I like to wet sand the model again with  600 and 1200 sand paper to get a smooth finish on the palstic surface.

Friday, August 10, 2018

Kit review vol.36: Northrop F-5E Tiger II Hasegawa 1/32



Subject:
Northrop F-5E Tiger II
Scale:
1/32
Manufacturer:
Hasegawa
Price
US$ 80,00 plus shipping
Description
Injected plastic model with waterslide decals.
Comments
This is Hasegawa's 1/32 scale F-5E Tiger II. I have two of these kits, one in an Hasegawa boxing and another released by Revell. It is a nice model, with good overall detail but from an old mold with raised panel lines. I decided to build these one after i bought the new Kittyhawk kit of these same plane in 1/32 scale. I guess i needed the challenge. As a Brazilian modeler i will build it in our countries colors. Stay tuned because there is more to come!










Friday, August 3, 2018

Engine walkaround vol.25 : BMW132


Subject: BMW132
Location:Musée d'lair et de l'espace, Le Bourget, Paris, 2015.
Comments:BMW took over a license for manufacturing air-cooled radial engines from Pratt & Whitney on 3 January 1928. The nine-cylinder model Pratt & Whitney R-1690 Hornet was initially manufactured virtually unchanged under the designation BMW Hornet. Soon BMW embarked on its own development. The result was the BMW 132 that went into production in 1933, which was essentially an improved version of the Hornet engine. A number of different versions were built. Aside from the carburetor designs used mainly in civilian aircraft, versions with direct fuel injection were manufactured for the German Luftwaffe. The engines had a displacement of 27.7 L (1,690 cu in) and generated up to 960 PS (950 hp; 710 kW) depending on model.The 132 found widespread use in the transport role, remaining the primary powerplant of the Junkers Ju 52 for much of its life, turning the BMW 132 into one of the most important aircraft engines for civilian aircraft during the 1930s.Numerous pioneering flights were undertaken with the BMW 132. The most impressive was the first direct flight from Berlin to New York in a four-engined Focke-Wulf 200 S-1 Condor. It covered the distance to New York in 24 hours and 57 minutes on 10 August 1938.



Friday, July 20, 2018

Aircraft walkaround vol.97: Junkers F13


Subject: Junkers F13
Location:Musée d'lair et de l'espace, Le Bourget, Paris, 2015.
Comments: The Junkers F.13 (also known as the F 13) was the world's first all-metal transport aircraft, developed in Germany at the end of World War I. It was an advanced cantilever-wing monoplane, with enclosed accommodation for four passengers. Over 300 were sold. It was in production for thirteen years and in commercial service for almost twenty.The F.13 was a very advanced aircraft when built, an aerodynamically clean all-metal low-wing cantilever (without external bracing) monoplane. Even later in the 1920s, it and other Junkers types were unusual as unbraced monoplanes in a biplane age, with only Fokker's designs of comparable modernity. It was the world's first all-metal passenger aircraft and Junkers' first commercial aircraft. The designation letter F stood for Flugzeug, aircraft; it was the first Junkers aeroplane to use this system. Earlier Junkers notation labelled it J 13. Russian-built aircraft used the designation Ju 13. Like all Junkers duralumin-structured designs, from the 1918 J 7 to the 1932 Ju 46, (some 35 models), it used an aluminium alloy (duralumin) structure entirely covered with Junkers' characteristic corrugated and stressed duralumin skin. Internally, the wing was built up on nine circular cross-section duralumin spars with transverse bracing. All control surfaces were horn balanced. Behind the single engine was a semi-enclosed cockpit for the crew, roofed but without side glazing. There was an enclosed and heated cabin for four passengers with windows and doors in the fuselage sides. Passenger seats were fitted with seat belts, unusual for the time. The F.13 used a fixed conventional split landing gear with a rear skid, though some variants landed on floats or on skis. The F 13 first flew on 25 June 1919, powered by a 127 kW (170 hp) Mercedes D IIIa inline upright water-cooled engine. The first production machines had a wing of greater span and area and had the more powerful 140 kW (185 hp) BMW IIIa upright inline water-cooled motor. Many variants were built using Mercedes, BMW, and Junkers liquid-cooled inline engines, and Armstrong Siddeley Puma, Gnome-Rhône Jupiter and Pratt & Whitney Hornet radial engines. The variants were mostly distinguished by a two letter code, the first letter signifying the airframe and the second the engine. Junkers L5-engined variants all had the second letter -e, so type -fe was the long fuselage -f airframe with a L5 engine.